The Last Recital

CD album cover 'The Last Recital' (GEN 85050) with David Oistrach, Paul Badura-Skoda

GEN 85050 EAN: 4260036250503

23.6.2006 Special offer
18.90 € 16.90 €

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Genuinely historic.

There are some CD recordings you’d rather not say much about or hear people discuss. Instead, all you want to do is be completely immersed in the beauty of what has been recorded. David Oistrakh and Paul Badura-Skoda performing Mozart, Beethoven, and Schubert. A recording with these artists is reason enough to settle back and give this GENUIN disc your undivided attention. Learning, too, that this recording would be Oistrakh’s last recital performance lends this release an added historic quality. It is hard not to get the impression that that the twentieth century’s greatest musicians have lined up on to pay homage to the violinist.

"The composure with which Oistrach allows Schubert’s A-Major Sonata to repose has the effect of one big understatement. Nonetheless, the lyrical qualities of the underestimated piece can nowhere be experienced more beautifully, freshly and naturally than in this newly-issued live recording of the last recital."
DIE ZEIT, 7. 12. 2006


Read the review in Diapason magazine

David Oistrach violin
Paul Badura-Skoda Piano

Genuinely historic.

There are some CD recordings you’d rather not say much about or hear people discuss. Instead, all you want to do is be completely immersed in the beauty of what has been recorded. David Oistrakh and Paul Badura-Skoda performing Mozart, Beethoven, and Schubert. A recording with these artists is reason enough to settle back and give this GENUIN disc your undivided attention. Learning, too, that this recording would be Oistrakh’s last recital performance lends this release an added historic quality. It is hard not to get the impression that that the twentieth century’s greatest musicians have lined up on to pay homage to the violinist.

"The composure with which Oistrach allows Schubert’s A-Major Sonata to repose has the effect of one big understatement. Nonetheless, the lyrical qualities of the underestimated piece can nowhere be experienced more beautifully, freshly and naturally than in this newly-issued live recording of the last recital."
DIE ZEIT, 7. 12. 2006


Read the review in Diapason magazine

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Tracklist

  1. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    Sonata in F major KV 377
    Molto Allegro
  2. Adagio
  3. Allegretto
  4. Franz Schubert
    Sonata in A major D 574
    Allegro moderato
  5. Scherzo. Presto-Trio
  6. Andantino
  7. Allegro vivace
  8. Ludwig van Beethoven
    Sonata in C minor op. 30/2
    Allegro con brio
  9. Adagio cantabile
  10. Scherzo: Allegro
  11. Finale: Allegro
  12. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    6 Variations in D minor KV 360
  13. Franz Schubert
    Sonata in G minor D 408
    Allegro giusto
  14. Ludwig van Beethoven
    Sonata in F major op. 24
    Scherzo: Allegro molto
  15. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    Sonata in E flat major KV 481
    Adagio

Genuinely historic.

There are some CD recordings you’d rather not say much about or hear people discuss. Instead, all you want to do is be completely immersed in the beauty of what has been recorded. David Oistrakh and Paul Badura-Skoda performing Mozart, Beethoven, and Schubert. A recording with these artists is reason enough to settle back and give this GENUIN disc your undivided attention. Learning, too, that this recording would be Oistrakh’s last recital performance lends this release an added historic quality. It is hard not to get the impression that that the twentieth century’s greatest musicians have lined up on to pay homage to the violinist.

"The composure with which Oistrach allows Schubert’s A-Major Sonata to repose has the effect of one big understatement. Nonetheless, the lyrical qualities of the underestimated piece can nowhere be experienced more beautifully, freshly and naturally than in this newly-issued live recording of the last recital."
DIE ZEIT, 7. 12. 2006


Read the review in Diapason magazine